Virtual Assistant Services You Could Offer

30 Virtual Assistant services you could offer

Another popular question from new VAs is what services they should offer their clients. Obviously this will depend on lots of things such as demand, your niche, your skill set, your interests, your work history and your location, but here’s 30 services you can consider providing to start you off.

 Services you could offer

  1. Creating/updating/maintaining databases & CRMs
  2. Collating business cards into an Excel sheet for uploading to CRMs or address books
  3. Data entry
  4. Basic bookkeeping (Click here to check UK Govt money laundering regulations)
  5. Data mining / online research
  6. Typing up notes
  7. Minute taking (This pays incredibly well and I have a course if you’re interested!)
  8. Video creation/editing/uploading
  9. Social media set up/training/maintenance/scheduling
  10. Facebook, Twitter or Google ads – creating, monitoring & analysing
  11. Setting up/managing webinars & podcasts
  12. Forum commenting/monitoring
  13. Setting up LinkedIn groups (Click here if you need LinkedIn training)
  14. Photoshop work
  15. Transcription
  16. Marketing – creating sales pages/squeeze pages/pop up email boxes
  17. Creating/editing/formatting templates & guides
  18. Event coordination – venue finding & confirmation/collating attendees & documents/on-site support
  19. Chasing outstanding invoices
  20. Diary/calendar management – scheduling meetings, syncing with devices, adding upcoming events
  21. Email management – detox/labels/filters/folders
  22. Writing/editing/formatting reports & presentations
  23. Researching/making travel & accommodation arrangements
  24. Lifestyle management – personal duties inc buying gifts, dry cleaning, booking restaurants & events, house moving, researching cheaper utility companies, paying bills etc
  25. Blog set up/writing/SEO/editing/scheduling
  26. Website set up/writing/SEO/editing/scheduling (Click here to learn WordPress)
  27. Newsletter set up/writing/autoresponders/editing/maintenance/scheduling
  28. eBook editing/formatting/publishing
  29. Gmail set up & training
  30. Designing/formatting infographics, logos, banners, social media profile images

Don’t offer

Call answering services. They’re a right pain in the arse and you’ll never get a minute to yourself. Suggest the client uses a call-answering service instead. You can always get the summary emails sent to you by the company so you can call them all back in one go.

Click here to find out how to analyse your CV to work out your skill set and what your niche and services could be.

Tips

  • Think about your niche and what tasks people in it might need doing
  • Keep learning so you’re constantly honing your existing skills and adding new ones
  • Consider charging a retainer for ‘bitty’ tasks
  • Only offer services that you actually know how to do
  • Only offer services that you actually like doing
  • Don’t take on anything that doesn’t fit in with other clients, existing tasks or your main business objective such as being completely virtual or being able to work around family commitments etc
  • Basically don’t take on anything that doesn’t tie in with why you decided to become a VA in the first place – it may be money coming in now but it’ll definitely become a problem you’ll need to fix later
  • Watch out for people trying to save money on a large job when they should hire a professional Copywriter, Web Developer, Graphic Designer etc instead

Resources

Are you finally ready to take action and set up your own Virtual Assistant business yet?

17 Comments

Farrukh

Brilliant info, but it seems for the USA & Canada markets. How can I get info to start this idea for myself as I reside in UK.

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Joanne Munro

Hi Farrukh. I’m a UK-based VA and so are most of my readers so all the info on the site is aimed at people whatever country they’re in. Plus you really need to think about the info and apply it to your own situation. You have to have initiative, resourcefulness and nous to be a successful freelancer. Being a VA is the same as being any freelancer – you need to find clients, do work for them, invoice and get paid. That’s it. The rest is just detail. x

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Virtual Helpmate

Perfect list. I’ve been a VA for the last 2 years now. I’ve covered most of this list and I’m still expanding my knowledge and experience.

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Louisa

I’m doing my research now with the aim to become a VA around spring time 2016 (need to give 3 months notice) and this is a really useful list. I’ve done a variety roles and so this provides me with a really good starting point for considering which of my skills would be beneficial to others. Thanks!

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How to become a Virtual Assistant | Bloggers Making Money

[…] Find out how I get my own clients 30 VA services you could offer  […]

Reply
Joanne Munro

Yes, all these services are ones you could offer depending on what you know how to do or want to learn how to do. Try to lead with admin support though and try no to be all things to all people or nobody will hire you!

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Mariane

Thank you for giving out this list of services. I am, as a VA, starting to learn these servies so I can provide as much to my clients. It’s just quite confusing why can’t we offer the call answering services? I came from the call center industry so I know how so much easier and helpful it is clearing the issues through a phone call.

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Joanne Munro

Hi Mariane, I don’t mean to say you CAN’T offer call answering services. I’m just saying in my experience, they’re a nightmare to manage as a VA as you can never get on with anything else if it’s you that’s taking the calls. Referring the client to a call answering service is always much better so you can actually get on with other stuff. It’s not very cost or time effective for a VA. x

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Talia

I am setting up my va business as we speak. I feel totally unprepared. Your website is basically my bible! The only only issue that concerns me is that many clients seem to need Call answering services. Whether it is answering their customers’ calls or scheduling meetings with them etc. I honestly rather not do that. Especially if you have 3 clients and you have to answer their own clients calls?! I’ll go mad! I barely used the phone when I worked at my corporate job why would I need it now? It is hard getting the first client so I’ve thought about going through those websites that hire you (mostly to get a feel of how the work will be like) but most of those require you be available by phone and have a land line. I have skype, I can get google voice but that is to speak to my client. i really don’t want to spend my earning on getting skype credit. Do you think I can be successful and get clients without offering phone type services?
Thanks in advance!

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Joanne Munro

I have always advised never to offer call answering services for those very same reasons. I would either get them to use a dedicated call answering service (much cheaper for them too) or you sort it out fr them. SO you pay the call answering service then charge the client for the service with a small mark-up.

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